Album Review: 2 Menace Drinking Juice Rolling Dice in Flatbush – Dice Cannon

So glad to see DICE CANNON (pictured right on the album’s cover art) bounce right back into the game after (what seems) years of lying low.

His comeback comes in the form of a 12-track set, ‘2 Menace Drinking Juice and Rolling Dice in Flatbush’, enlisting fellow spitters including Juice Cannon and Natty Boi Zoe, whose spoken word collection, ‘My Body, My Soul Vol.1’, was featured on the blog back in April and stole the blog’s Album of the Month title last month.

Taking us back to the golden hip-hop era (similar to KRS-One and Public Enemy No.1) through introductory track ‘Drinking Juice Rolling Dice’, the album goes on a journey of different variations of the genre, incorporating a real nice lick of old school R&B/soul, a modern spin on 70s soul/funk and a rather emotive piano-led/boom bap piece (through Bishop Vs Raheem).

When a rapper like DICE CANNON disappears from the scene for a while and returns with a confident swagger, well you know that he cooked up something beyond good.

Check him out below:

Must Listens: Drinking Juice Rolling Dice, Bishop Vs Raheem, Sin Til I Win, Concrete Jungle

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Album Review: When Divorce Is Mentioned – Mike Body

MIKE BODY captures those dreaded feelings when a marriage reaches breaking point with latest album, ‘When Divorce Is Mentioned’, released late last month.

The Christian rapper enlisted a lineup of upcoming artists to give different perspectives and stages of a marriage heading fast to the D-word, over the arrangements of trance like tones and rampant bass. One of the views included Body giving a heartfelt insight into how children suffer due to lack of stability at home caused by the experience of divorce.

Overall, ‘When Divorce Is Mentioned’ is a full-bodied collection that’s sure to offer some comfort to those who experienced a messy break-up. The theme of the album shows that the hip-hop genre a sincere side.

Check out the album, with song recommendations below:

Must Listens: Battle For First, Kids Gotta Suffer, Back to Work

Album Review: Southwood Waltz – David Ayscue

DAVID AYSCUE‘s debut album, ‘Southwood Waltz’ offers a simplistic yet whimsical approach to his singer/songwriter folkore/Americana fusion, allowing his mellow and delicate vocal instrument to poke through as he documents his transition from youth to adulthood.

‘New York’ gives the eight-track collection a stunning introduction, where the gentle guitar melodies takes centre stage and provides that real authenic acoustic setting.

‘Sliverlake Sunday’ and ‘In My Day’ slightly switches the tone and uplifts the album; the arrangements of ldyllic overtones, the horn section and satisying guitar plucks provides that real gritty soulful rock that really hits the soul.

The hauntingly beautiful ‘Where We Land’ concludes the set with it’s stripped down, guitar/vocal combo, which then builds into an euphoric Mumford-and-Sons style, 4-on-the-floor anthem.

‘Southwood Waltz’ puts Ayscue in good standing as one of the artists to watch for this year. His debut offering is not bad, not bad at all!

Listen to Ayscue’s ‘Southwood Waltz’ below:

Must Listens: New York, Penny, Where We Land

Album Review: Flow Riiot – Torii Wolf

When I first heard of TORII WOLF through debut single, ‘Free’ somehow I was compelled by the too-cool-for-school raspy vocals against the bass-driven number. Releases ‘Big Big Trouble’ and ‘Pain Killer’ followed and I was totally hooked!

The next big release was the 15-track production coming in the form of ‘Flow Riiot’, produced by DJ Premier (so you know you’re really onto a good thing here).

An atmospherically dreamy sample of The Messenger’s 60s funk/soul classic, ‘California Soul’, leads the set through ‘Everlasting Peace’ – and from there, a range of genres were introduced –  from alternative hip-hop to piano/violin-led arrangements. ‘Take It Up On Monday’ is definitely one for the nostalgics as the three-minute production brings on that old school/rare groove laid-back vibe. Possessing heavy influence hip-hop/boom bap of late 80s/early 90s, ‘Shadows Crawl’ will be the one for the serious hip-hop heads’ collection.

‘Flow Riiot’ ends on smooth note with ‘Moscow’. Led by the acoustic guitar, Torii adds an inexplicable magic, creating a real stellar singer-songwriter approach to the production.

It’s sure a mix bag of pleasure and anyone who enjoys listening to makeovers of old genres will have at least one favourite. Through ‘Flow Riiot’, this New Yorker has more than proved that her Throaty yet delicate instrument has that across the board appeal.

You’re here now…might as well check it out….

Must listens: Meant To Do, 1st, Body, Take It Up On Monday, Moscow

Album Review: The Introduction – Zoe and Zara

Since appearing on NEW LEASE MUSIC with their single ‘Get Up Now’ last January, my mind would sometimes wonder on the whereabouts of twin sisters ZOE & ZARA. A few week ago, my curiosity was quashed when received an email from the duo.

After five years on London’s music scene, the pair decided to start a new chapter on their journey. So after much deliberation, long hours in the studio (which came with tears and near-breakdowns – their words, not mine!) ZOE & ZARA now present their debut album, ‘The Introduction.’

Recorded at The Blue Studio in Dalston (my hometown!), ‘The Introduction’  displays a delightful journey of Jazz (modern and from the golden era), old school soul and neo soul alternating between the down right funky and the ambient/easy listening.

The flood of tears and near breakdowns definitely paid off –  their neo-soul signature is more rich and refined (compared to their previous releases). The sisters’ venture into other genres by far didn’t disappoint. Their soothing vocals in fourth effort ‘Hey Sir’ were well suited to the golden jazz/big band/rat pack combo.

After reading the review, I think you guys know how I feel about this album. All there’s left say is – ZOE & ZARA, I salute you!

Check out the album and song recommendations below:

Must Listens: Weather Is Golden, Autumn Afternoon, Butterfly, Talk About It